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Editor's Corner


by Dick Martin

After participating in the discussion group it came to be that I should take over being the editor of this issue. I can look back now on the last few months and see what a wonderful thing has occurred, and feel a great debt to those such as Coren Z. who have put so much work into creating the initial throws of activity which have created this publication. Perhaps our understanding of nonviolence is as poorly formed as our organization of this zine; but if our efforts grow into a movement, then our efforts no matter how humble or misfit, will be toward an evolution of social organization as a life affirming process. The anarchist idea is more than a devastating indictment of authoritarian political social order, it is more importantly a real alternative to the way things are. It is the way things can be, that is what gives us inspiration. We propose reason over violence, love over power and cooperation over wealth. In spite of the fact that doubters say that power must change power, violence must deal with violence, that good government must replace bad government, our way is superior to all as the way of peace will only bring peace and that freedom is an activity of the free.

An anarchist society must necessarily be a benevolent society which is self organized and regulated through its own social dynamics, without an authoritarian structure to maintain the social paradigm. The social reality in its working functions must rely upon the active conscience of the individuals and the effectiveness of the social organization. We don't expect that every individual will be a perfect example of a free citizen, but I think in a society where cooperation, freedom, and shared economy are the principle ways of doing things those who would seek to promote authoritarian values would not find much audience. The problem I see is not what will happen when we get there, but how do we get there. Thus the revolutionary task is to create the paths by which we can achieve our goals and if we are successful then certainly the means which bring us to our goals are substantial enough to maintain them. For too long the revolutionary movement has seen the process as a conflict with authoritarian organization thus the political nature of the movement; there should be the greatest emphasis on the constructive work of anarchism in the daily life of people in their communities, without this we will never go anywhere. If we begin to build the social values into effective organizations in our communities through which the people can serve their own interests better than the offerings of the state, then we may begin to make some progress. I don't think I am talking about a new ideology but a way of living by which the better side of human nature can prevail over greed, empowerment and various sorts of antisocial behavior which are accepted as normal in our current "society." Back to Archive